Part 1 - Initial Draft (February 2015)

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(1) 8. SUSTAINABLE PLACES

(1) Towns

(1) Dronfield

8.1 Dronfield is the largest town in North East Derbyshire, and the only one with a train station. Historically, Dronfield developed as two settlements; the principal one being on the hillside around the Parish Church and the secondary, more industrialised township, in the valley below, strung out along the River Drone beside the Chesterfield to Sheffield Road. It is highly constrained by the Green Belt that helps prevent Dronfield from merging with Chesterfield, to the south, and Sheffield, to the north. As a retail and service centre it serves the needs of local residents and residents of the villages between the two major centres of Chesterfield and Sheffield. Dronfield also attracts passing trade from the B6158, though this is limited due to the A61 Dronfield-Unstone bypass.

8.2 Dronfield has many positive assets, including two Conservation Areas (the town centre and a small area in Dronfield Woodhouse), together with a further Conservation Area in Coal Aston, which forms part of Dronfield Parish. The town also has a significant number of listed buildings, and low levels of deprivation, which together with the countryside setting make it an attractive place to live and work. The train station is a highly valued transport facility both within Dronfield and for the district as a whole, providing excellent links to Sheffield and Chesterfield as well as locations further afield.

8.3 Dronfield has got a reasonable mix of house types, although is perhaps lacking smaller properties (the proportion of terrace housing is below the district average). In terms of tenure, there is an imbalance, with only 10% social rented, half the district average. This needs addressing in order to provide a well balanced mixed and sustainable community.

8.4 Based on 2011 population figures and using the current standards (which will be reviewed in Local Plan Part 2), Dronfield is significantly lacking in green space, outdoor sports and children’s play space. The council acknowledges that due to the Green Belt constraints and limited sites within the town, it is unlikely that this deficiency will be addressed in full. The NPPF, however, does allow for the provision of such uses on Green Belt land in exceptional cases. The Council’s approach to this is set out in Policy LP13: Exception Sites for Affordable Housing. This also means that the existing green spaces within the Settlement Development Limit, including the large green places such as Sindlefingen Park, will need to be very strictly protected.

(1) Dronfield Town Centre

8.5 The town centre health check shows that between 2008 and 2013 there has been a sharp drop in the amount of office floorspace, but the number of shops has increased, and the town centre remains relatively buoyant. Evening uses stand at 9.4% of total floorspace, mainly made up of cafes and takeaways, with a particular concentration of uses on Chesterfield Road. Vacancy rates of ground floor retail floorspace have decreased in a period where many towns have seen a significant increase, and are well below the national average. In relation to the national averages, ground floor retail figures show that in 2013 comparison retail was well below the national average for floorspace, balanced by the level of convenience floorspace which is significantly higher than the national average. Service retail is broadly in line with the national average. Overall, the town centre is performing well, providing a decent range of town centre uses and types of shop. Car parking is an issue however, both in overall terms and in accessibility. In the town centre in 2013 around 4% of car parking bays were disabled bays. This is below the recommended 6% of bays (or 3 bays per car park) as set out in the DETR Advisory Leaflet 5/95.

8.6 Dronfield Heritage Trust and the Town Council are both active and the initiatives such as the Barn project are positive additions to the town’s heritage and attractions. The market and historic aspects to the town are real opportunities, but the spread out form of the town and the condition of the civic centre need addressing in order to maintain the vitality and viability of the town centre.

(9) Policy LP20: Dronfield

Dronfield will maintain its role as the social and economic focus of the north of the District.

Provision will be made for at least 285more homes by 2031 and employment land in accordance with Policy LP16.

Sites for new housing will be allocated on a range of previously developed and greenfield sites within the Settlement Development Limit.

The efficient reuse of previously developed land within Dronfield will be encouraged, including sites within the Town Centre where such development would help to meet housing needs, including living above shops.

Due to Green Belt constraints, the Council will seek to facilitate the development of land for housing and employment, and will support proposals that provide infrastructure improvements required to unlock the development potential of sites.

In order to maintain Dronfield as a Principal town, the Council will:

  • Redefine the town centre to provide a more coherent and compact centre (in Local Plan Part 2)
  • Redefine surrounding shopping parades as Local Centres (Boundaries will be identified in the Local Plan part 2 see policy LP17)
  • Support proposals that maximise the benefits from, and protect and improve access to, the railway station
  • Help to re-balance the local housing market through the provision of affordable housing in line with Policy LP7: (Green Belt)
  • Encourage proposals that facilitate the provision of new green space, outdoor sports facilities and children’s play space to meet identified needs
  • Encourage uses within the town centre that enhance the offer of the town as an evening destination, particularly leisure facilities

Key Evidence Base

You told us that...

The Green Belt around Dronfield is very important to local people. Previously developed land within the settlement should be used for development and green spaces should be preserved. The Plan should also respect the local character of the town.

Alternative Options considered but not selected...

None

The NPPF tells us that...

Plans should be positive, recognising town centres as the heart of their communities, and set out policies for the management and growth of centres, supporting their vitality and viability.

Policy implements Local Plan Objective: N1

How will the policy be monitored?

Indicator:

Target: No target

(1) Dronfield Town Diagram

Dronfield Town map

Clay Cross

8.7 Clay Cross is located on the main A61 corridor between Chesterfield and Alfreton, bordered to the east by the Midland Mainline railway, and the River Rother. To the west, there is very attractive and sensitive Peak fringe landscape, which is a recreational, visual and biodiversity asset.

8.8 Clay Cross has many positive assets with a good range of services and facilities, excellent bus routes and frequency of services, local employment opportunities, and a choice of development sites. It is a relatively modern town but with a rich heritage dating back to the nineteenth century and the development of coal mining and its links with George Stephenson. The town benefits from a historic core of Victorian buildings, with the best preserved historic buildings along High Street and Market Street, together with Clay Cross Hall and its parkland setting, protected since 2010 with Conservation Area designation. There are larger commercial buildings to the north of the town which is where the former Bi-Waters site is located. The eastern and south eastern areas of the settlement are mainly residential in character. Sharley Park is a large attractive green space in the centre of the town and a focus for recreation, containing a leisure centre, and sports facilities. It is also the location of a community hospital.

8.9 The A61 is subject to congestion as it passes through Clay Cross, especially during peak hours and whenever there is congestion or disruption on the M1. In 2010 protected schemes (in the Local Transport Plan) for a Market Street diversion in Clay Cross were ‘rescinded’, meaning that the County Council no longer intends to promote them and will not seek the protection of any land against other forms of development. A Clay Cross rail station is identified in the Local Transport Plan 3 as having the potential for appraisal as County Council sponsored scheme (see Policy LP36 Provision & Safeguarding of Transport Infrastructure). Provision of a railway station as part of the development of the Bi-Waters site is a priority of the Council. (See Policy LP4 Biwaters).

8.10 There are issues that need addressing, including a significant deficiency in outdoor sports facilities, high unemployment despite the proximity of jobs, traffic congestion and some areas are require better management and maintenance. There is a significantly above average (District and national) percentage (31.4%) of social rented housing in Clay Cross, as set out in the Settlement Role and Function Study 2013 Update. A good balance of different housing types and tenures is important in maintaining a sustainable community. Clay Cross falls within the top 20% nationally of most deprived communities as identified in the national Indices of Multiple Deprivation.

Clay Cross Town Centre

8.11 The town centre health check shows that between 2008 and 2013 the number of units in the town centre has increased by 15, with a resulting increase in floorspace of around 7000sq m, due to the new Tesco and Bridge Street development. There has been a notable increase in service retail beauty sector. Takeaways are a significant element of the town centre offer at 8.5% of units, and along with public houses, represent the majority of evening uses with a particular concentration of activities in High Street and Market Street. Despite the overall increases in floorspace, vacancy rates of ground floor retail floorspace have doubled between 2008 and 2013, and are above the national average, as is the amount of charity shop floorspace. Recent surveys (Citizens Panel) indicate that people using the town centre are dissatisfied with road traffic, the quality of the pedestrian environment, graffiti and emissions from traffic. Facilities for cyclists are limited. The first phase of the pedestrian walkway through the town (the esplanade) associated with the new Bridge Street development is improving the accessibility and environment for pedestrians, although the narrow pavements on High Street and high volumes of traffic create difficulties for those walking in some areas of the town. There is a good amount of public and private surface car parks in the town. There are opportunities to enhance the market and provide indoor market, and to build on the good location on the A61. The new Tesco and Bridge Street development is a benefit to the town, but has skewed the balance of the town in terms of lacking a defined centre.

>Clay Cross Regeneration Framework

8.12 In 2013 the council adopted a regeneration framework for Clay Cross, with the vision that “Clay Cross will capitalise upon its unique location within the Sheffield City Region and proximity to the Peak District National Park to create a successful independent town.” The framework identified 5 action areas:

  • Town Centre: consolidating strengths.
  • High Street: reinforcing gateways.
  • Bridge Street Triangle: develop potential.
  • The former Biwaters site: delivering 21st century communities.
  • Coney green: growing employment opportunities.

Table 5: Key priorities and projects identified in the Clay Cross Regeneration Framework:

  • Regeneration of the land and buildings north of Market Street
  • Revision and improvement to the bus station to create an enhanced pedestrian environment
  • Provision of a market square to create a hub to pedestrian routes.
  • Better physical links between public buildings - adult education centre, library, job centre and Citizens Advice Bureau
  • Creation of a ‘Community Campus’ – grouping of civic and amenity facilities hospital and leisure centre provide an important community hub facing onto Market Street
  • Arts/cultural and heritage/youth facilities if viable and sustainable
  • Protection of existing urban quality in the conservation area.
  • High quality landscaping
  • Quality office space to maintain existing and attract new businesses
  • Implement town centre pedestrian priority
  • Implement town centre parking accessed directly off A61
  • A new route for the A6175 through the former Biwaters site to provide a direct link to the Coney Green end of Market Street
  • Developing town centre gateways on the A61 and Market Street
  • Opportunity to improve the public realm and the shop fronts including personalising shops and restoring advertising signs
  • Proposals for short term/temporary uses for vacant sites and shops will be encouraged and a flexible approach to uses will be taken where proposals offer street scene improvements
  • Protection of the church of St. Bartholomew’s, including views
  • Address the narrowness of the pavements on High Street
  • Consistent improvements to boundary treatments and a common approach to business signage
  • Develop Bridge Street Triangle as a modern employment quarter
  • Develop additional outdoor sports and leisure facilities at Sharley Park
  • Build upon the sports role of Egstow Park
  • Extend Kenning Park up to Clay Lane providing improved connections to the town centre and improve, extend and regenerate the existing allotments
  • Secure the Railway Esplanade to deliver a high quality public realm spine planted with an avenue of trees that recreate the railway tunnel through the town.
  • Focus public realm improvements including public spaces on the key movement routes, regeneration areas, and parks.
  • Preparation of development briefs for key sites

(5) Policy LP21:Clay Cross

Clay Cross will maintain its role as the main social and economic focus of the southern sub area of North East Derbyshire District.

Provision will be made for at least 735more homes by 2031and employment land in accordance with Policy LP16.

Sites for new housing will be allocated on a range of previously developed and greenfield sites within and on the edge of the Settlement Development Limit.

All development proposals will be expected to demonstrate how they contribute to the successful delivery of the Clay Cross Regeneration Framework key priorities and projects set out in Table 5. In particular, the council will:

  • Support the reuse of previously developed land within and on the edge of Clay Cross where appropriate, including sites within the Town Centre and living above shops.
  • Seek to provide a new outdoor sports facility in Sharley Park in line with Policy XX
  • Protect, implement and maintain the route of the esplanade as shown on diagram XX
  • Protect sites/land for the future provision of a railway station
  • Protect and enhance the church of St Bartholomew’s including views to and from the church
  • Safeguard/allocate land off the A61 for parking provision
  • Identify/allocate Bridge Street triangle as an employment area in accordance with policy LP16
  • Redefine the town centre boundary in Local Plan part 2 based around a new market square off Market Street as shown on diagram XX
  • Take a flexible approach to uses to encourage proposals for development that will help to secure the regeneration of land north of Market Street
  • Encourage uses within the town centre that enhance the offer of the town as an evening destination, particularly arts and cultural uses and social/leisure facilities for young people
  • Continue to work with partners to deliver regeneration projects to benefit the most deprived members of the community
  • Ensure that Local Labour Agreements are secured on major developments in order to provide employment and training opportunities to local people

New retail development will be focused in and on the edge of the town centre, with limited new provision as part of a new neighbourhood centre to be accommodated within the BiWaters Strategic site as set out in Policy LP4.

Key Evidence Base

  • National Planning Policy Framework
  • Clay Cross Regeneration Framework

You told us that...

The Plan should support the regeneration of Clay Cross and the town’s role as the largest centre in the south of the District. Development should preferably take place on previously developed land, and respect the local character of the town.

Alternative Options considered but not selected...

None

The NPPF tells us that...

Plans should be positive, recognising town centres as the heart of their communities, and set out policies for the management and growth of centres, supporting their vitality and viability.

Policy implements Local Plan Objective: S2

How will the policy be monitored?

Indicator:

Target: No target

Clay Cross Town Diagram

Clay Cross map

Eckington

8.13 Eckington is a small town, located to the east of Dronfield, close to the boundary with Sheffield to the north. The town centre serves the retail and service needs of residents from the town itself, as well as surrounding villages including Mosborough, Renishaw and Marsh Lane. The town centre has benefited in recent years from many improvements, including the resurfaced cobbled market street which is pedestrianised. The town also benefits from many historic buildings, protected by the Eckington and Renishaw Conservation Area. The town is constrained by the Green Belt and accordingly, there are very limited opportunities for new development.

8.14 Although there is a significant need for affordable housing in the Northern sub area, there is above average (District and national) percentage (29%) of social rented housing in Eckington, as set out in the Settlement Role and Function Study 2013 Update. There is a good balance of house types in Eckington, which will need to be maintained. The council acknowledges that due to limited development opportunities and the approach to affordable housing as set out in policy LP7 (Green Belt), there will be limited new market housing. In order to maintain a good balance of different housing types and try to redress the imbalance in tenures is very important to achieve the best mix on any sites that do come forward, either as allocations or windfalls.

8.15 There is a deficiency of Green Space in Eckington, based on 2011 population figures and using the current standards (which will be reviewed in Local Plan Part 2). The council acknowledges that due to the Green Belt constraints and limited sites within the town, it is unlikely that this deficiency will be addressed in full. The NPPF, however, does allow for the provision of such uses on Green Belt land in exceptional cases. The Council’s approach to this is set out in Policy LP13: Exception Sites for Affordable Housing. This also means that the existing green spaces within the Settlement Development Limit will need to be very strictly protected.

Eckington Town Centre

8.16 Between 2008 and 2013 the number of units in the town centre has stayed the same, and apart from increases in comparison and residential and a drop in vacant units, the changes in the town centre have been relatively minor. In 2013 evening uses made up 9.2% of units, the majority being cafes and takeaways concentrated on Market Street and to a lesser extent on Southgate. Eckington market continues to contribute to the town centre.

8.17 Ground floor retail figures show that in 2013 comparison retail was significantly below the national average, balanced by the level of convenience floorspace which is significantly above the national average. Although overall vacancies have reduced, the levels of vacant ground floor retail are above the national average at 13.2% by premises (national average is 11.54% GOAD data 2012), and 13.6% by floorspace (national average is 9.38% GOAD data 2012).

8.18 The Eckington health centre and pharmacy on Gosber Road on the edge of the town centre along with the significant number (9) of A1 retail uses, mainly comparison and service retail, on High Street, could form extensions to the town centre boundary, which will be investigated to inform the Local Plan Part 2.

8.19 A recent survey (Citizens Panel) indicated that although the majority of people use the car to travel to Eckington, a significant number walk, and none cycle. The survey revealed dissatisfaction with road network access and road traffic, cycle routes and cycle parking, footpaths, paving and street furniture. Almost half of respondents felt that Eckington town centre does not feel like a place with a distinctive character, and a significant number felt that the town centre area was not well defined.

8.20 The Eckington Town Centre Development Framework, adopted in May 2012, provides the context for the spatial approach to new development in the town centre taken by the Local Plan. The revitalisation of the town centre is the principal aim of the Framework. The Framework sets the following strategic objectives:

Table 6: Eckington Framework Strategic Objectives

  1. To encourage the revitalisation of Eckington town centre with a distinctive and robust retail core
  2. To promote the heritage and tourism offer within Eckington whilst strengthening local identity and civic pride
  3. To create an attractive and legible network of streets, footpaths and spaces
  4. To encourage activity throughout the day within the town centre
  5. To promote a democratic centre- accessible to all and with facilities for all
  6. To provide diversity of compatible uses within the town centre
  7. To support local employers and employment initiatives which can stimulate development
  8. To integrate the town into its context through public transport and green links

8.21 The Eckington Framework identifies the main town centre development opportunities as the redevelopment of Northgate House, a reorganisation of the bus station to free up land off Pinfold Street, perhaps incorporating this with the land to the rear of Market Street, the Market Street (Foxes Yard) car park and rationalisation of the ‘civic campus’ area (library, swimming pool etc). It is important that these opportunities are capitalised on within the Local Plan.

(5) Policy LP22: Eckington

Eckington will maintain its role as a secondary town providing local services to its wider rural catchment area in the northern sub area of the District.

Provision will be made for at least 260 more homes by 2031 and employment land in accordance with Policy LP16.

Sites for new housing will be allocated on a range of previously developed and greenfield sites within the Settlement Development Limit.

All development proposals within and on the edge of the town centre will be expected to demonstrate how they respond to the objectives of the Eckington Town Centre Development Framework set out in Table 6. In particular, the council will encourage proposals that:

  • facilitate the provision of green space to address identified deficiencies
  • provide a mix of housing tenures including open market, private rented and affordable housing
  • improve the accessibility of the town centre for pedestrians and cyclists
  • incorporate public realm improvements within the town centre
  • protect and enhance the role of the Civic Campus
  • facilitate the regeneration of Northgate House

Key Evidence Base

  • National Planning Policy Framework
  • Eckington Town Centre Development Framework (2012)
  • The Northern Settlements Housing Capacity Study 2012
  • Housing Needs, Market and Affordability Study (HNMA) (2011)
  • North East Derbyshire Strategic Green Belt Functionality Study (2014)

You told us that...

The protection of services in Eckington is important to local people. Accessibility through the town centre, as well as to and from the town centre, should be improved. The Plan should assist in making the town centre a vibrant place, which attracts an increased footfall.

Alternative Options considered but not selected...

None

The NPPF tells us that...

Plans should be positive, recognising town centres as the heart of their communities, and set out policies for the management and growth of centres, supporting their vitality and viability.

Policy implements Local Plan Objective: N1

How will the policy be monitored?

Indicator:

Target: No target

Eckington Town Diagram

Eckington map

(16) Killamarsh

8.22 Killamarsh is a small town, located in the north eastern corner of the district, close to the boundaries with Sheffield and Rotherham. The town is well served by public transport, with regular buses to and from surrounding large urban areas of Sheffield, Rotherham, Chesterfield and Worksop. There are good links to the Super Tram network with buses to Crystal Peaks and Halfway in Sheffield. The town is constrained by the Green Belt and accordingly, there are very limited opportunities for new development.

8.23 The Chesterfield Canal, which was routed through Killamarsh, opened in 1777 and played an important part in the social and economic development of Killamarsh up until its closure in the 1950’s. Currently the canal route through Killamarsh plays an important role as a recreation and green infrastructure route, along with the Trans Pennine Trail to the west of Killamarsh.

8.24 There is a significant deficiency of Green Space and outdoor sports facilities in Killamarsh, based on 2011 population figures and using the current standards (which will be reviewed in Local Plan Part 2). The Council acknowledges that due to the Green Belt constraints and limited sites within the town, it is unlikely that this deficiency will be addressed in full. The NPPF, however, does allow for the provision of such uses on Green Belt land in exceptional cases. The Council’s approach to this is set out in Policy LP13: Exception Sites for Affordable Housing. This also means that the existing green spaces and outdoor sports within the Settlement Development Limit will need to be very strictly protected.

8.25 The current housing stock is well balanced, with both type and tenure broadly in line with the district average. It is important to maintain this balance to ensure a sustainable community.

Killamarsh Town Centre

8.26 Recent Town Centre Health Check has revealed that between 2008 and 2013 the number of units in the town centre has increased by 2, with a significant decrease in the amount of vacant floorspace due to the Aldi development. In 2013, vacancy rates were 8.9% by premises (national average is 11.54% GOAD data 2012), and 4.6% by floorspace (national average is 9.38% GOAD data 2012). In 2013 half of vacancies were on Sheffield Road. Takeaways make up a significant element of the town centre offer at almost 10% of units, and account for the majority of evening uses with a particular concentration on Bridge Street and Sheffield Road. This is almost double the national average for fast food and takeaways (2012 GOAD data) is 5.52% of units.

8.27 There is a good amount of public and private surface car parks in the town, with much of it free, although in 2013 only 4.5% of designated car parking bays were disabled bays which is below the recommended 6% of bays (or 3 bays per car park) as set out in the DETR Advisory Leaflet 5/95. Recent surveys (Citizens Panel) indicate that a significant number of people walk into the town centre, and there is a high level of satisfaction with footpath routes into the town centre. None, however, cycle, and there was a notable dissatisfaction with open space, and no public green open spaces within the town centre.

8.28 The route of the Chesterfield Canal runs through the town but is not currently navigable and some sections are built on. The Council alongside other Partners (through the Chesterfield Canal Partnership) is committed to protecting the original route of the Chesterfield Canal and securing its full restoration acknowledging the economic and regeneration benefits this can bring to communities along its length. The Chesterfield Canal Trust is also very active in terms of work to improve the canal and its immediate environs.

(8) Policy LP23: Killamarsh

Killamarsh will maintain its role as a secondary town providing local services to its wider rural catchment area in the northern sub area of North East Derbyshire District.

Provision will be made for at least 155 more homes by 2031 and employment land in accordance with Policy LP16.

Sites for new housing will be allocated on a range of previously developed and greenfield sites within the Settlement Development Limit.

In order to maintain Killamarsh as a sustainable town with a healthy vibrant centre, the council will:

  • Encourage proposals that facilitate the provision of new green space and outdoor sports facilities to address identified deficiencies
  • Protect the original route of the Chesterfield Canal as shown on Diagram XX
  • Encourage proposals that enable the reinstatement of the canal along the original route or any preferred alternative route as agreed by the Chesterfield Canal Partnership
  • Improve facilities for cyclists in the Town Centre
  • Focus new social infrastructure in the Community Campus area as shown on Diagram XX
  • Retain the existing town centre boundary

Key Evidence Base

You told us that...

The Green Belt around Killamarsh is important to local people, as well as the protection of services and infrastructure. The Plan should also encourage the reinstatement of the Chesterfield Canal through Killamarsh.

Alternative Options considered but not selected...

None

The NPPF tells us that...

Plans should be positive, recognising town centres as the heart of their communities, and set out policies for the management and growth of centres, supporting their vitality and viability.

Policy implements Local Plan Objective: N1

How will the policy be monitored?

Indicator:

Target: No target

Killamarsh Town Diagram

Killamarsh map

Large and Small Settlements

8.29 The District’s large settlements have a very important role to play in meeting the day to day service and community needs of our residents, and providing attractive and sustainable places to live. A number of the large settlements have a good range of shops and facilities, which will be identified as Local Centres in the Local Plan Part 2 in order to protect and enhance them for the benefit of local communities. A significant number of large and small settlements have identified deficiencies in green infrastructure and sports space, and a housing imbalance which does not enable mixed and sustainable communities

8.30 Some of the District’s small settlements, very small villages and hamlets as set out in the Settlement Hierarchy do not have a defined settlement boundary. These places tend to have very limited or no provision of services and facilities. Some are not very compact or comprise scattered or loose knit groupings of buildings and farms where development could have a significant adverse effect on the character of the settlement. The council does, however, acknowledge that all settlements have a role to play in meeting the housing needs of the district.

8.31 The distribution of housing by settlement is informed by specific requirements that have been identified in some settlements (as set out in table 7), where higher levels of growth could provide the opportunities and flexibility to deliver the necessary range of housing types and tenures, including specialist housing for older people. For those places which would benefit from regeneration initiatives, new development can help to lever in contributions to provide community facilities for example, and contribute to regeneration projects.

(1) Table 7: Specific Requirements identified in Large and Small Settlements

A mix of housing types and tenures to include a significant element of:
Settlement Affordable Housing Market Housing Larger Dwellings Smaller Dwellings Housing for Older people Green Space Outdoor Sports facilities Local Labour Agreements
Holmewood
Tick
Tick
Tick
Tick
North Wingfield
Tick
Tick
Wingerworth
Tick
Tick
Tick
Tupton
Tick
Tick
Calow
Tick
Grassmoor
Tick
Tick
Tick
Shirland
Tick
Tick
Renishaw
Tick
Tick
Stonebroom
Tick
Tick
Tick
Tick
Arkwright Town
Tick
Tick
Tick
Ashover
Tick
Tick
Morton
Tick
Tick
Pilsley
Tick
Tick
Temple Normanton
Tick
Tick
Heath
Tick
Higham
Tick
Tick
Lower Pilsley
Tick
Tick
Fallgate
Tick
Tick
Kelstedge
Tick
Long Duckmanton
Tick
Brackenfield
Tick
Wessington
Tick

(7) Policy LP24: Large and Small Settlements

In large and small settlements as defined in the Settlement Hierarchy, sites will be allocated for new housing in line with recommended growth as set out in Table 3.

In order to address identified needs and create mixed and balanced communities in large and small settlements, major development proposals are expected to provide a mix of housing types and tenures, new green space, outdoor sports facilities and employment and training opportunities for local people secured through Local Labour Agreements on major developments, as indicated in table 7.

Until boundaries for local centres in large settlements are defined in the Local Plan Part 2, proposals for new employment development within and on the edge of large settlements will be permitted where they are:

  • easily accessible by public transport
  • compatible with neighbouring uses

Key Evidence Base

  • National Planning Policy Framework
  • Settlement Role & Function Study

You told us that...

Alternative Options considered but not selected...

The NPPF tells us that...

Pursuing sustainable development involves seeking positive improvements in the quality of the built, natural, and historic environment, as well as in people’s quality of life, including making it easier for jobs to be created in towns and villages, achieving net gains for biodiversity, achieving better design and better places, as well as widening the choice of high quality homes.

Policy implements Local Plan Objective: N1

How will the policy be monitored?

Indicator:

Target: No target

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