DRO/1601

Showing comments and forms 1 to 18 of 18

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1456

Received: 20/02/2015

Respondent: Mr Harold Wightman

Representation:

DRO/1601:
This is designated to accept water overflowing from the stream after rainfall. Government warns against building on flood plains.
Replacing flood plain with hard surfaces puts at risk properties downstream, negating reason why balancing dam was built in first place.
Area used for leisure because work by volunteers to enhance the habitats for wildlife, keep the area tidy. This contributes to healthier environment. People walk, exercise dogs and children and watch bird life especially when the dam is holding water.
The natural resource and open public space has been backed by local councils for years. Why change of heart?

Full text:

With regard to proposals for housing development under proposal DRO/1601:

* This is designated to accept water overflowing from the stream after heavy rainfall. The government warns against building on flood plains.
* Replacing the flood plain with concrete and other hard surfaces puts at risk properties downstream of the flyover - a backward step, negating the reason why the balancing dam was built in the first place.
* This area is increasingly used for leisure because of the work done by volunteers to enhance the habitats for wildlife of all kinds, keep the area tidy and presentable. This contributes to a generally healthier environment. People walk there, exercise dogs and small children and watch bird life especially when the dam is holding water.
* The development as a natural resource and open public space has been backed by local councils for some years. Why the change of heart?

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1460

Received: 26/02/2015

Respondent: Mr & Mrs William and Maralyn Dommett

Representation:

Concerns regarding possible housing development on The Lea Brook Valley Project:

- Local people have worked to provide a wildlife habitat / valuable community asset
- Such a project fosters community spirit and cohesion
- Many species of wildflowers, birds, minibeast and mammals, frogs, toads and newts on site
- Area provides open space
- Unsuitable site due to geological make-up: wetlands, brook, steep-sided valley, trees
- Possible flooding and landslips if area is developed
- Disturbance of foundations of overhead bypass by excavations for housing
- Work has already been carried out on above as consequence of water-logged land

Full text:

Our concerns regarding a possible housing development on The Lea Brook Valley Project are as follows:

- Local organisations and volunteers have worked tirelessly over a 10 year period to provide a wildlife habitat / valuable community asset
- Such a project fosters a community spirit and cohesion by involving multi-interest groups
- Many species of wildflowers, birds, minibeast and mammals are found in this area
-Frogs, toads and newts live here
- Area provides an open space for walking, discovery and education
- Unsuitable site due to geological make-up, e.g. wetlands, brook, steep-sided valley, large number of trees
- Possible flooding and landslips if area is developed
- Disturbance of foundations of overhead bypass by excavations for housing
- work has already been carried out on the above as a consequence of water-logged land

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1466

Received: 28/02/2015

Respondent: Mrs Norma Jex

Representation:

I wish to object to the site DRO/1601 as being selected as a potential site for house building. The area is frequently under water as acts as s flood plain to protect lower parts of Dronfield. For the past 10 years the Leabrook Valley Green Team have worked hard to maintain this area as a green space beneficial to both wildlife and local residents. The work is supported by the NE District council, town council and the national organisation ARocha. The area is used by large numbers of residents including children walking to school through a pleasant open space.

Full text:

I wish to object to the site DRO/1601 as being selected as a potential site for house building. The area is frequently under water as acts as s flood plain to protect lower parts of Dronfield. For the past 10 years the Leabrook Valley Green Team have worked hard to maintain this area as a green space beneficial to both wildlife and local residents. The work is supported by the NE District council, town council and the national organisation ARocha. The area is used by large numbers of residents including children walking to school through a pleasant open space.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1467

Received: 01/03/2015

Respondent: Ms Rachel Mason

Representation:

Please see full representation.

Full text:

DRO/1601 has been identified as a site with long term development potential post 2022.

Why is this land being considered for development at all, long term or otherwise?

1. It is urban greenspace which is essential to residents of Dronfield for the reasons outlined below.

2. It is a flood defence - an active balancing dam which regularly becomes very full, year-round, after periods of heavy rain and snow.

The run-off from the surrounding built-up areas is piped through DRO/1601; this prevents the surrounding heavily built-up areas from flooding.

Its existence is essential to eliminate flood risk not only to nearby homes, a number of which are as little as 8 metres from its border - but also to the numerous other houses within the immediate flood risk area.

Not only does this flood defence prevent the area from becoming a flood plain and removes flood risk for large areas of Gosforth Valley, it also decreases flood risk for other built up areas downstream.

DRO/1601 is the wetland area which is the start of a water course reaching from Gosforth Valley, through the centre of Dronfield to the River Drone.

Any development on this area - at any time - would mean the newly developed houses and more importantly, existing houses, being subjected to an imminent flood risk which was not previously present.

No Dronfield resident should have to live in fear of this becoming reality over the next seven years to 2022 or beyond.

3. In addition to the above, DRO/1601 is also a local conservation area and as the wetland and meadow habitat at the start of the Lea Brook Valley it forms part of the green wildlife corridor that runs right through Dronfield.

Its diverse habitat provides a home for an equally diverse range of wildlife.

Plants such as wildflowers, rushes, nettles and an ancient hedgerow thrive and give home to a diverse range of animal species.

From invertebrates such as bees and butterflies, to amphibians such as newts and frogs, to apex predators such as owls, kestrels and herons. Ducks and moorhens are also a regular nesting feature.

Around its circumference there is a gravel nature trail path with benches and information boards and dog waste bins - and in addition to being heavily used by dog walkers and residents walking to and from Gosforth Valley to Dronfield town centre, it is also heavily used by pedestrians such as school children who use it as a safe passage through the estate twice daily.

The Lea Brook Valley Environmental Project Group has been working to conserve and preserve the landscape at DRO/1601 since 2005, owing to its varied and distinctive character e.g. diverse habitat such as wetland, meadow, hedgerow, tree lined areas.

In 2014, in addition to an existing copse of trees, an additional 1000 trees were planted at DRO/1601 by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust and local residents, Scouts and the Civic Society. The 1000 new trees include rowan, cherry, hazel, holly, guelder rose and hawthorn. They were planted as part of Derbyshire Wildlife Trust's Value in Trees Project.

This area is of great importance - as well as an essential flood defence it is part of a locally prepared nature conservation strategy and as such should be protected and enhanced.

As points 1, 2 and 3 demonstrate, this land in no way lends itself to development, either now or in the future - and Dronfield residents should have the threat of the destruction of this vital urban greenspace removed from the agenda once and for all.

With thanks for your help.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1468

Received: 02/03/2015

Respondent: Mr and Mrs S Greatbatch

Number of people: 2

Representation:

I have heard alarming reports that there are plans to build houses on the flood defense system.

When we moved in to our property we were told this land is protected, it serves a purpose as a flood defense system, and would never be built on.

We have a young family and enjoy walking round the pond and taking in the wildlife.

We would be absolutely 100% apposed to any plans related to building on this land, and if required would consider legal action if any building commenced.

Full text:

I have heard some very alarming reports that there are plans afoot to build houses on the flood defense system situated at the above.

I live at 4 Grisedale Walk and our house backs onto the flood defense system. When we moved in to our property in 2007 we were told this land is protected, it serves a purpose as a flood defense system, and it would never be built on.

We now have a young family and enjoy walking round the pond and taking in the wildlife that dwells within the marshes.

We would be absolutely 100% apposed to any plans related to building on this land, and if required would consider legal action if any building commenced. I know I speak for all other residents on Grisedale Walk.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1474

Received: 03/03/2015

Respondent: Dronfield Town Council

Representation:

Some residents have expressed concern as to the classification of Leabrook Valley in the proposed plan.

Full text:

Some residents have expressed concern as to the classification of Leabrook Valley in the proposed plan.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1490

Received: 14/03/2015

Respondent: Mrs Kathryn Moore

Representation:

I am concerned about plans for the reservoir part of Lea Brook Valley; important habitat for birds and wildlife. I have enjoyed helping and planting trees to encourage more wildlife to visit and live in the once littered part of town.

This area will loose all bird and wildlife on FLOOD plain.

Covering FLOOD plain with housing will lead to FLOODING of new houses and other dwellings around reservoir.

The fly over has a horrendous noise and is not a nice look for a housing development. RATS will run into homes as soon as tractors arrive to churn up everthing.

Full text:

I am very concerned about your plans for the reservoir part of Lea Brook Valley; as this is an important environmental habitat for water loving birds and other wildlife that I, for one have enjoyed helping with and planting trees to encourage more wildlife to visit and live in the once littered and dowdy part of our town.

This area for one; will loose all the bird and wildlife on was is FLOOD plain land.

Two; covering FLOOD plain land with a concreat housing estate will everdently lead to FLOODING of the new houses and of other dwellings around the reservoir.

Three; the already monstrosity or the fly over has a horrendous noise value continuously and is not a nice look for a housing development. Not to mention the RATS that will run straight into our homes as soon as the tractors arrive to
churn up everthing.

That's all I have to say on this matter.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1506

Received: 16/03/2015

Respondent: Mr John Bennett

Representation:

DRO/1601 cannot be developed because:
Flood defence - area protects surrounding houses/viaduct pillars from flood risk. Development would cause unacceptable flood risk.
Urban greenspace- current use is in line with plan vision/objectives providing accessible, biodiverse green space used by pedestrians, dog walkers, children, residents.
Area recently improved with footpath expansion, information points, tree planting to enhance biodiversity. Long-term investment by local groups/volunteers.
Conservation area - DRO/1601 only wetland section of Lea Brook Valley green corridor, conservation project funded by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust. It sustains range of wildlife, including apex predators.
DRO/1601 conservation area flood defence must be protected and maintained.

Full text:

DRO/1601 is identified in the document "4. Schedule of Sites C-D" as a site with "long-term development potential - post 2022". However, the site cannot be developed for three primary reasons:
1. It is a vital component of Dronfield's flood defences
2. It is urban greenspace
3. It is a conservation area


1. Flood defence

The entirety of site DRO/1601 forms a flood defence system. Headed by a balancing dam at the northern end, the area fills with water from heavy rain year-round, protecting all surrounding structures from flood risk. This includes surrounding houses, all houses downstream, and the structural support pillars of the A61 viaduct.

Development of the site would expose all these homes and structures to significant and unacceptable flood risk. In light of the increasing necessity for robust flood defences, this alone rules out development of the site.


2. Urban greenspace

Section 3 "VISION AND OBJECTIVES" of the document North East Derbyshire Local Plan (2011-2031) Part 1 states:

"The District will have accommodated sustainable growth whilst the distinct character of different areas and communities will have continued to be preserved and promoted, creating safe, integrated and healthy communities by ... protecting and creating open spaces to provide accessible green infrastructure and biodiversity networks which promote healthy lifestyles and provide realistic alternatives to the use of the private car."

DRO/1601 is completely in line with this objective, providing an easily-accessible, biodiverse green space used by pedestrians, dog walkers, school children and numerous local residents.

The area has recently been improved for this purpose with the expansion of the footpath around its perimeter, information points detailing the vast range of wildlife locals can see in the area, and the planting of additional trees to enhance the already significant biodiversity of the site.

DRO/1601 is therefore a site that the Local Plan states must be protected.


3. Conservation area

DRO/1601 forms the start of the Lea Brook Valley green corridor. Recognised and funded by the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust, this conservation project has been a collaborative venture between a number of local groups since 2005, including the Civic Society and the Scouts.

DRO/1601 is the only wetland section of the Lea Brook Valley. It sustains a remarkably diverse range of wildlife, as noted on the information boards mentioned above, including butterflies, bees, amphibians, numerous small mammals and birds, an ancient hedgerow, marsh flora, and resident and visiting wildfowl. Significantly, the area's biodiversity is sufficient to sustain apex predators including herons, kestrels and owls.
The local community has recently invested heavily in improving the area, providing the paths and information boards already mentioned, along with 1000 new trees planted in 2014. This was a long-term investment made by local groups and volunteers from the community, for the benefit of Dronfield as a whole, and is intended to enhance this unique wild space in the heart of the community for generations to come.

The development of DRO/1601 is not possible if this important community conservation area is to be maintained.


In conclusion, the status of DRO1601 as a flood defence rules it out as a potential development site, and its value to the community as an accessible green space and a conservation area has been demonstrated by the investment of time and money in its enhancement over recent years. I would therefore be very grateful if the local community could receive confirmation that it has been removed from the list of potential development sites.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1511

Received: 17/03/2015

Respondent: Lea Brook Valley Project, Dronfield

Representation:

Dear Sirs,
I attach hereto a submission by the Lea Brook Valley project group of Dronfield inn respect of DRO/1601.
Peter Carr

Full text:

Dear Sirs,
I attach hereto a submission by the Lea Brook Valley project group of Dronfield inn respect of DRO/1601.
Peter Carr

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1539

Received: 20/03/2015

Respondent: Mr David Lomax

Representation:

Objection made on the basis of increased flooding risk and loss of local green space & conservation area. Increased traffic congestion.
Loss of public amenity.

Full text:

Having attended the local 'drop in' session and subsequently studied the Draft Local Plan I would like to raise an objection to the proposed use of this area for the development of housing.
The area is totally unsuitable for the following reasons:-
1- (D6 Climate Change Adaptation & Policy, LP30 Flood Risk & N4) The area currently forms part of the Lower Town flood defence system, constructed to hold back a substantial volume of surface water which accumulates in times of heavy rain or snow melt. If this is jeopardised in any way we are likely to see a return of the major flooding problems in the lower Drone valley.
Any residential developments in an area like this subject to frequent flooding events would be unlikely to obtain affordable or, in fact any insurance cover.

2. (D8 Environmental Protection, D9 Landscape character, D13 Green Infrastructure, D18 Local Amenity) - This land is a valuable ecological open space and conservation area. It is one of a very few such spaces remaining in Dronfield. Trees, covered by TPO's and wildlife habitat would be destroyed by any development of the site.
The area is popular with local residents for recreational purposes and is crossed by a public bridleway/footpath which would no doubt be compromised.

3. (D14 Traffic & Transport) - There are already serious traffic problems in the area which should in no way be added to. Considerable congestion feeds into Wreakes Lane and the High Street as people travel by car or public transport to and from their places of work. These are the major traffic flow routes in and out of the estate.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1549

Received: 21/03/2015

Respondent: Mrs Mavis Ashby

Representation:

This site is a valuable wildlife resource for the people of Dronfield. Financial investment has been made and a great deal of time spent by volunteers in making the area an attractive habitat to nummerous bird species and other wildlife, it also contributes to the flood defense in this are. This site should not even be considered for housing development given the benefits to the towns people and its contribution to our environment

Full text:

This site is a valuable wildlife resource for the people of Dronfield. Financial investment has been made and a great deal of time spent by volunteers in making the area an attractive habitat to nummerous bird species and other wildlife, it also contributes to the flood defense in this are. This site should not even be considered for housing development given the benefits to the towns people and its contribution to our environment

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1555

Received: 23/03/2015

Respondent: Alison Wintrip

Representation:

My husband and I are opposed to the siting of 56 houses on this site due to the ever decreasing areas of green open spaces in the area. We have lived in Dronfield Woodhouse for over 25 years and have watched these areas increasingly disappear. We also think that the surrounding infrastructure cannot support the extra vehicles this development would produce.

Full text:

My husband and I are opposed to the siting of 56 houses on this site due to the ever decreasing areas of green open spaces in the area. We have lived in Dronfield Woodhouse for over 25 years and have watched these areas increasingly disappear. We also think that the surrounding infrastructure cannot support the extra vehicles this development would produce.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1669

Received: 26/03/2015

Respondent: Mr Adrian Hubbard

Representation:

Development should not be permitted because the site is a community asset and not as currently formally described, green amenity space would be further eroded, access would be difficult and the impact of water run-off underestimated.

Full text:

I wish to register my opposition to the proposed construction of 56 dwellings in this land parcel. My reasons are set out below.
1.The Dronfield Woodhouse estate has seen continuous housing development and consequent reduction in its green spaces over the last 20 years. Building on this site would remove the last green space between Coniston Road and the A61 flyover.
2. In the Dronfield Assessment b(1) document the area is described as "vacant overgrown land". This may have been correct in 2008 but is not so true now. The Lea Brook Community group, with support from Dronfield Civic Society, have been working in the area to remove overgrowth and debris from the existing balance pond and this work continues (see Dronfield Town Council Meeting minutes of 03/01/2012). The only reason that the site became overgrow in the first place is that the owners, Keyland Developments Ltd., (a Bradford company, I believe) had allowed it to become so.
3. In the Dronfield Assessment I note that there has been no formal habitat assessment of the area. However, work already carried out confirms that it is a major breeding area for amphibians and there is a bird box project that is ongoing. The impact of re-shaping the balance pond is unknown.
4. The current balance pond does an excellent job of reducing the flood risk to properties lower down Lea Brook,particularly those at the bottom of Fanshaw Bank. Addition of roadways, buildings and hard-standing around the pond, which your own assessment shows would need to be restructured, would probably increase the run-off rate and would certainly reduce the surface area absorption of ground water. I believe that this could be sufficient to reduce the balance pond's ability to contain this water which, during the winter, can already become quite high.I find it discomforting to note that neither of the current flood risk maps (Dwg. 55328/NE/A/01 Rev.C & Dwg. 55328/NE/F/01 Rev. C) acknowledge the presence of this possibility in the centre of the proposed development.The alternative to re-shaping the balance pond would be to culvert Lea Brook but this would be in direct contravention of Section 9.4 - Culverting of Open Watercourses in the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment.

4. My understanding is that it would only be possible to provide suitable access to the site if additional land were to be acquired from some other source. I note that access from Gosforth Drive and Sheards Drive was ruled out in the existing Dronfield Assessment.

In summary, I submit that this site is not currently as represented in the Dronfield Assessment b(1) document, which is out of date. Use of the site for housing,or any other building purpose would remove the last green space in this area of the Dronfield Woodhouse estate. The possible impact on drainage of groundwater and the existing flow of Lea Brook has been underestimated and the possible impact of water on houses further down the valley ignored.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1777

Received: 25/03/2015

Respondent: Mr Andrew Gore

Representation:

1 site of natural beauty for local community; provides open space for recreational use.

2 The site hosts a large number of forna and flora to flourish in a heavily developed residential district.

3 The site is part of the water management system for the Lea Brook Valley to allow a controlled flow of water down the valley to alleviate the flooding that was a regular feature for those who lived there.

4 site is a natural resource for local community, enriching lives of those who live around.

5 site helps to educate children, including involvement in the local community.

Full text:

I am writing to object to the building of 56 houses on the site DRO1601 for the following reasons:

1 This is a site of natural beauty for our local community that provides an open space for recreational use.

2 It is a site of natural beauty and providing an environment for a large number of forna and flora to flourish in a heavily developed residential district.

3 The site is part of the water management system for the Lea Brook Valley to allow a controlled flow of water down the valley to alleviate the flooding that was a regular feature for those who lived there.

4 It is a site that our local town council and community have earmarked as a source for enriching the lives of those who live around it as well as providing opportunities for members of the community to benefit their community acting as volunteers.

5 it is a site through which children within our local schools are able to understand the world they live in as well as put into practice what it means to be involved in their local community for its benefit and enrichment.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1918

Received: 17/03/2015

Respondent: Mrs Rosemary Mason

Representation:

This land is not suitable for consideration for development in the either the short or long term.

1. It is a flood defence
2. This land is a valuable and essential greenspace and a local conservation area
3. Its present use is essential as it eliminates flood risk to many nearby homes -

In conclusion the above demonstrates the importance of DRO/1601 NEVER being devolped, and should be removed from the development plan now, and Dronfield residents deserve to have the threat of development and destruction of such a valuable and vital urban greenspace removed from the agenda forthwith.

Full text:

Document: Schedule of sites Consultation Document (February 2015)
Section: DRO/1601
Support/Object: Comment

DRO/1601 has been identified as a site with long term development potential
Post2022

This land is not suitable for consideration for development in the either the short or long term.

1. It is a flood defence - acting as a balancing dam. It regularly becomes very full after heavy rain or snow. Also it is very wet year round.
2. This land is a valuable and essential greenspace for the residents of Dronfield.
DRO/1601 is also a local conservation area as it forms at the start of the Lea Brook Valley the wetland and meadow area, and is part of a green wildlife corridor which runs thro the centre of Dronfield. Its supports very diverse plant and wildlife supecies examples of which are Ducks, Moorhens,Herons, Owls and Kestrals. Also Bees, Butterflys, Newts, frogs and many wildflowers, trees an ancient hedgerow,rushes,nettles etc.
At is outer edge is a recently installed gravel nature trail - with information boards - benches and bins for dog waste.

In 2014 an additional 1000 trees were planted in DRO/1601 by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust assisted by local residents, the Civic Society and the Scouts. Species of tree included in the large enterprise were hawthorne, rowan, holly,hazel, guilder rose, and cherry. These all planted as part of Derbyshire Wildlife Trust's Value in Trees Project. There is also a copse of existing trees on DRO/1601.

DRO/1601 in using the flood defence as a locally supported nature convservation area best use is already being made of this site. It is a very important amenity to both wildlife/nature and the local residents. In addition it is ver well used by many residents as a dog walking area.

Further to point 1 the existence of DRO/1601 in its present use is essential as it eliminates flood risk to many nearby homes - some of which are less than 10 meters from its border also many other houses at risk.

Any devolpment of new houses on this DRO/1601 site would putat risk of flooding many established homes which are not currently threatened by flooding.

As the runoff from Gosforth Valley centres on DRO/1601 and some is piped thro it, not only does it serve to protect a great number of houses directly in this area, it also protects built up areas further downstream.

In conclusion the above demonstrates the importance of DRO/1601 NEVER being devolped, and should be removed from the development plan now, and Dronfield residents deserve to have the threat of devopement and destruction of such a valuable and vital urban greenspace removed from the agenda forthwith.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1959

Received: 22/03/2015

Respondent: Mr David Gleadall

Representation:

Dronfield already a very built up area with minimal green spaces in the immediate central area.
Lea Brook Drone valley protects lower Drone valley from flood which is a high risk area.

Area supported by a number of groups/volunteers;
Natural beauty offers a lovely landscape for all to enjoy. home for many rare species;
Incorporates a Public Bridleway,
Building on this area would not protect or enhance character and quality of this local green landscape.
There are a number of derelict area's along Sheffield/Dronfield Rd which could be built upon, this would improve the general appearance central corridor.

Full text:

After attending a public consultation I felt I had to comment with regard to new development plans in the Dronfield Gosforth Valley area.
Dronfield is already a very built up area with minimal green spaces in the immediate central area.
The proposed area of the Lea Brook Drone valley for housing is of concern as the area protects the lower Drone valley from flood which is a high risk area. Even with a normal amount of rain the valley which runs parallel to Gosforth Drive rapidly fills up to protect the lower area but is also an established wildlife area enjoyed by all within the community.
At a time of climate change including flooding I feel the council has a duty of care to protect rather than place people at risk, the Sheffield floods were a result of many people/families losing their houses and incurring enormous damage, it took years for families to return to their homes we need to learn from this disaster.
The area is supported by a number of groups, charities, volunteers as it's natural beauty offers a lovely landscape for all to enjoy. It is the home for many rare species of flowers, birds, mammals, reptiles and incorporates a Public Bridleway, building on this area is not by any means protecting or enhancing the character and quality of this local green landscape.
There are a number of derelict area's along the main Sheffield/Dronfield Rd which could be built upon, this would improve the general appearance of the central corridor whilst also offering housing opportunities.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 1964

Received: 23/03/2015

Respondent: Mrs Joan Prout

Representation:

I have concerns about the proposed land. It's a flood plain, a balancing dam which releases collected water from the area, slowly so that the bottom of Dronfield doesn't get flooded. It is also an important nature reserve. Last year 1,000 trees were planted to encourage wildlife. There is a type of chimney/funnel at the bottom end, maybe to release radon or some other gasses. I am sure there are other areas which would be much more suitable than a flood plain. The vast majority of people in this area have great concerns over this piece of land.

Full text:

I wish to make a statement regarding my concerns about the proposed land between Coniston Road and the Flyover in Dronfield. Surely this is a joke. How can you possibly consider building on this piece of land. Its a flood plain, a balancing dam which releases collected water from the area, slowly so that the bottom of Dronfield doesn't get flooded. Not only is it a flood plain but It is an important nature reserve too. We have a vast variety of birds, butterflies, newts, frogs and an abundance of various wildlife. They relay on this stretch of water and the stream leading from it. Last year 1,000 trees were planted to encourage wildlife. People not only walk their dogs but people just like to go for a walk round there looking at different wildlife. Surely this area would not be cost effective. How would you prevent this land from flooding for instance. I also noticed a type of chimney/funnel at the bottom end - don't know what its for - maybe to release radon or some other gasses. I am sure there are other areas which would be much more suitable than a flood plain. The vast majority of people in this area have great concerns over this piece of land.

Comment

Schedule of Sites Consultation Document (February 2015)

Representation ID: 2166

Received: 30/03/2015

Respondent: Derbyshire Wildlife Trust

Representation:

Site holds significant and probably substantive nature conservation resources; recommend that it is not taken forward as housing land allocation;
DRO/1601 - DWT has been involved in substantial habitat works (Gosforth Valley) along with local community groups including Lea Valley. The site although not Local Wildly Site value is an important part of the ecological network and green corridor within a highly urban setting. In addition, the site is designed to accommodate flood water and attenuates for high flow rates. This is likely to be required in the future as a result of increasingly flashy flows and unpredictable storm events.

Full text:

I am responding as the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust on the above consultation, rather than under the terms of the SLA we have with the Council.

Under the terms of the SLA we have been working with Sharon Williams on the assessment of sites and have provided details of our initial views to her to inform the work that is being undertaken for sites which have passed your phase 1 assessment.

The comments below are based on our current knowledge of the site conditions and substantive nature conservation issues that exist on these sites.

Derbyshire Wildlife Trust most strongly recommend that the following sites hold significant and probably substantive nature conservation resources and we would recommend that they are not taken forward as housing land allocations;
 CX/1501 - supports a Local Wildlife Site Cavel Drive Meadows (NE375) which occupies the majority of the potential housing allocation.
 CAL/1601 - supports a Local Wildlife Site Land North of Somerset House (NE380). Derbyshire Wildlife Trust objected to the planning application on this site in 2011 and continues to maintain that object despite damage having been caused to the site.
 MOR/1601 - DWT has been involved in substantial habitat works on this site (Gosforth Valley) along with local community groups including Lea Valley. The site although not Local Wildly Site value is an important part of the ecological network and green corridor within a highly urban setting. In addition, the site is designed to accommodate flood water and attenuates for high flow rates. This is likely to be required in the future as a result of increasingly flashy flows and unpredictable storm events.
 ECK/902 & ECK1603 - these two sites are contiguous with each other and abut two Local Wildlife Sites (NE187 Smithy Brook and Margins and BO179 Smithy Brook in Bolsover) in addition a significant part of the site is identified as semi-natural grassland of biodiversity value and may on further assessment also qualify as a Local Wildlife Site. Development of the western end of ECK1603 is likely to be acceptable and Derbyshire Wildlife Trust would recommend that the boundary of this potential site is redrawn to exclude the semi-natural habitats of biodiversity value.

In addition to these sites DWT would advise that we have considerable concern regarding the boundary of the following sites as they support features of biodiversity value which would have a significant impact on the design and layout of any proposal for residential development;
 UN/1701 - This is a large site which requires some further assessment. However, part of the area is already recognised as supporting features of biodiversity value; Local Wildlife Site Ousle Bank Wood & Gorse (NE099) and potential LWS Ousle Bank Complex (pNE098)
 WW/1607 - This large site wholly encompasses the woodland Local Wildlife Site Nether Speighthill Wood (NE039).
 Where sites abut Local Wildlife Sites Derbyshire Wildlife Trust would expect that these biodiversity resources are suitably buffered as part of the ecological network and according to policies guidance as presented in the government's White Paper (The Natural Choice 2012) and the NPPF. Any allocation and future design brief should recognise such valuable features. This is particularly relevant to both allocations (WW/1609 and WW/704) adjacent to Sutcliffe & Hanging Bank Woods Local Wildlife Site (NE046).

Derbyshire Wildlife Trust officers will continue to work alongside the Council under the terms of the SLA to avoid, reduce, mitigate and compensate for impacts on biodiversity and will where necessary will raise or maintain objections to proposals on behalf of the membership and as an organisation.

I hope that the Council will be able to consider our comments positively and remove or adjust the boundaries of potential allocations as we have highlighted.